For nearly seven decades, Cristo Rey High School in Rancho Cordova has excelled at helping students from underserved communities get into college. “There are Catholic high schools in the area that are phenomenal; they welcome students whose parents can afford to pay significant tuition, and so we fill a different gap,” said David Perry, president of Cristo Rey High School. The school uses an income cap to ensure that students who enroll are among the most vulnerable. This is done to provide more opportunities for these families. In 2021, 99% of senior Cristo Rey graduates were accepted to college, many on full scholarship offers. Over 90% of the school‘s operating budget is funded by donations, and a work-study model allows students to pay for their education themselves. This work covers approximately 60% of the cost of educating students. There are currently 310 students enrolled at Cristo Rey High School and 95% of the population is Hispanic or Latino. The National Center for Education Statistics reports that about 36 percent of black and Hispanic students ages 18 to 24 make up college enrollment rates. Most of the students at Cristo Rey High School are also first-generation students, who take advantage of so many available resources to pay for their education. Marco Salcedo, a senior, is among the first-generation students attending the school, and he is ready to go to culinary school. He said his passion started with his mother’s baking as she tried to make ends meet to support her three children. “I always saw my mum. She did it when we were little just to get some extra income to feed our family and I loved how she found it so peaceful,” Salcedo said. Yesenia García Pardo has been accepted to eight universities and says it was her parents’ hard work that inspired her to pursue higher education and I see them struggling every day. You know, manual labor, you You can only do them for so long before your body starts to give up,” Pardo said. education.” You can always be first. If you don’t see a person representing you, be the person to represent others,” Pardo said. Cristo Rey High School and other community leaders announced the launch of the Securing The Dream philanthropic campaign to bring more resources for low-income students Nearly all of the 80 graduates of Cristo Rey High School in Rancho Cordova go on to graduate school.

For nearly seven decades, Cristo Rey High School in Rancho Cordova has excelled at helping students from underserved communities get into college.

“There are Catholic high schools in the area that are phenomenal; they welcome students whose parents can afford to pay significant tuition, and so we fill a different gap,” said David Perry, president of Cristo Rey High School.

The school uses an income cap to ensure that students who enroll are among the most vulnerable. This is done to provide more opportunities for these families. In 2021, 99% of senior Cristo Rey graduates were accepted to college, many with full scholarship offers.

Over 90% of the school’s operating budget is funded by donations, and a work-study model allows students to pay for their education themselves. This work covers approximately 60% of the cost of student training.

There are currently 310 students enrolled at Cristo Rey High School, and 95% of the population is Hispanic or Latino.

The National Center for Education Statistics reports that about 36% of black and Hispanic students ages 18 to 24 make up college enrollment rates.

Most of the students at Cristo Rey High School are also first-generation students, who take advantage of so many resources available to pay for their education.

Marco Salcedo, a senior, is among the first generation students attending the school, and he is ready to go to culinary school. He said his passion started with his mum’s baking as she tried to make ends meet to support her three children.

“I always saw my mum. She did it when we were little just to get some extra income to feed our family and I loved how she found it so peaceful,” Salcedo said.

Yesenia García Pardo has been accepted to eight universities and says it was her parents’ hard work that inspired her to pursue higher education.

“My parents both have very strenuous jobs and I see them struggle every day. You know, labor jobs, you can only do them for so long before your body starts giving up,” Pardo said.

She is leaning towards a full scholarship to Santa Clara University.

About 33% of college students today are the first members of their family to attend college, according to data from the US Department of Education.

“You can always be first. If you don’t see a person representing you, be the person representing others,” Pardo said.

Cristo Rey High School and other community leaders announced the launch of the Securing the dream philanthropic campaign to bring more resources to low-income students.

Almost all of the 80 graduates of Cristo Rey High School in Rancho Cordova go on to graduate school.